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Encyclopedia of Baldwin Wallace University History: Organizations - W

An Index of Historical Content and Their Sources

Women's Debate

Citation: Dean Webb, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1935), p. 56.

During the current year, a new organization was formed on this campus, that of a Women's Debate Team. This squad is as yet untried, but is rapidly learning the fundamentals of debate in preparation for a more complete program.

Early in the year, two freshmen girls were chosen to start this team. Under the guiding hand of Professor Burns, these two girls have made a conscientious effort to become schooled in debating principles. They have participated in their own local scrimmages and have gratefully received any criticism in order that advancement might be made. The Women's Debate Team has not engaged in any formal debates this year because of the fact that they are so new at the work. However, their purpose has been well accomplished and the campus may look for timely debates among college women next year.

Women's League

Citation: Dean Webb, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1935), p. 71.

The Women's League was first organized in 1924, and four years later the present constitution was written in which is stated the object of the League as follows: "To regulate all matters pertaining to the student life of its members which do not fall under the jurisdiction of the Faculty; to further in every way the spirit of unity among the women of the college; to increase the sense of responsibility toward each other; and to be a medium by which the social standards of the college can be made and kept high."

As each girl joins the ranks of students here, she automatically becomes a member of the Women's League, and is invited to attend its meetings on the third Tuesday of each month. In accomplishing their purpose, the League has sponsored: a freshmen tea, the Dad-Daughter Banquet, a formal dinner for the girls, the Co-ed Dinner, and a Mothers' Day tea.

Citation: Alvin Norcross, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1939), p. 24.

Every woman student is automatically a member of the Women's League, which was organized in 1924 for the purpose of creating a spirit of unity and fellowship among the women students.

The group sponsors several of the most interesting social affairs of the college year, including the annual Dad-Daughter Banquet, the Get-Acquainted Tea for Freshman Women, the Co-Ed Dinner, and the Mothers' Day Tea.

Citation: Doris Hauser, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1940), p. 67.

Upon registration on this campus every woman student automatically becomes a member of the Women's League. The executive cabinet, elected by the women students in assembly, carries out the aims of the organization. The real purpose of the Women's League is seldom recognized by most students. It exists to help co-ordinate the college life of all the campus women-dormitory, commuter, or town girl-so that they may have a more satisfactory and happy time here. Toward this end the Women's League cabinet appoints the Judiciary Council chairman, and the chairman for the judiciary committee of each residence hall, commuters, and town girls. Thus the League heads the women's student government on the campus.

By way of giving women a more rounded social life and of getting parents to the campus the League sponsors the Freshman Tea, the Dad-Daughter Banquet, the Co-ed Dinner, the Mothers' Day Buffet Supper (a new plan this year), and the Laurels chapel program. Margery Young headed the Women's League this past year.

Citation: Glenn F. Wickes, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1941), p. 19.

Establishing a complete activity program this year, the Women's League preserved its vitality through many traditional activities, and through the inauguration of several novel objectives.

A new note was sounded this year with the recognition of the freshmen through an extensive achievement program concerned with scholarship, extra-curricular activities, and personality development

Women's Self Government Association

Citation: Noreen Bonk Garman, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1955), p. 86.

The Women's Self Government Association administers rules for group living in the women's dormitories, tries to further a spirit of unity and understanding, and sponsors activities such as the annual Dad-Daughter banquet and Mother-Daughter week-end.

Members of this year's board are: President Alice Hofman V. Pres. Marlene Petty Sec. Pat Shrewsbury Treas. Barb Daniels Judiciary Head Gerry Redzinak

Committee Heads: Persis Nagel, Janet Reed, Janet Roll, Mary Ellen Brophy, Marion Thomas, and Marjorie Haskins.

Writers' Club

Citation: A. Wesley Roehm, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1928), p. 136.

The Writers' Club is an organization fostered by the department of English, to afford an outlet for the people who are afflicted with the disease known as "writers' itch". Membership in this club is open upon invitation by Professor Ridenour, of the English department, who is the head of the club. Meetings are held once a month at the home of Professor Ridenour.

The program usually consists of four or five papers which may include anything from one-act plays to blank verse.

Citation: Dean Webb, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1935), p. 70.

As the name indicates, the Writers' Club is designed to be an aid for aspiring or limping pens, It is intended to be a meeting-place for those who like to write, for those who think that they may develop some ability in the writing game, for those who may not care especially for writing but who feel that development in the power of expression is desirable.

There is no presupposition that most of the Writers' Club addicts will be English majors. Frequently entire programs are given without the appearance of any student primarily interested in the work of the English department.

One of the requirements for the living of the full life in any of the professions or vocations is the possession of the power of expression. This power is developed in many ways -reading, conversation, observation, writing. Writing develops interest in the observation of life, accuracy in expression, ability in seeing what is many times unseen, artistic power and appreciation. In no profession or occupation are such capacities other than highly desirable.

Citation: Alvin Norcross, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1939), p. 30.

B-W bards, playwrights, short-story writers! It is these campus scribes and their admiring literary fans who are members of the Writers' Club. The organization is practically an ideal one, for there are no dues, no roll-calls, and no officers. The purpose of the club, which is under the leadership of Professor Harry L. Ridenour, is to develop the literary talent on the campus and to give such ability an audience and to encourage appreciation.

Monthly meetings are devoted to the reading of student literary creations (gruesome murder mysteries, hilarious wit, inspiring poetry, "psychological" sketches, etc.) or to talks by outside speakers. This year, the group was fortunate enough to hear a talk by Robert Drake, a Berea editor and B-W graduate, and to enjoy the poetry of Dr. Harry J. Smith of the English department.

Citation: Glenn F. Wickes, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1941), p. 63.

Paging all B-W bards, playwrights and short story writers! It is these campus scribes and their admiring (?) fans who are members of the Writers' Club.

This organization is practically an ideal one since there are no dues, no roll-call and no officers. It is democracy in its purest form. Led by Professor Ridenour, its aim is the appreciation and encouragement of student effort, wit or otherwise in prose or poetry.

The doors are open to everyone so English majors are not privileged members. Monthly meetings are devoted to talks by outside speakers or to the reading of student productions. In this way each member has the privilege of presiding during the year.

Be on your guard, for the next roar of laughter heard will probably mean a rip-roaring session of the Writers' Club.

Citation: Mary Papp, ed., Grindstone (Berea, OH: Baldwin-Wallace College, 1945), p. 94.

Amateur writers are encouraged in original work by the Writers Club. Sponsored by the English Department, the organization is open to anyone on campus who has a flare for writing and a taste for creative effort. Meetings feature poems, essays, short stories, or character sketches by the members.

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